Regulate Tech #2: The Arab Spring Revisited

This time, Richard Allan discusses the Arab Spring, what we have learned as a society and how the Arab Spring might play out today. It is an interesting discussion, and Richard was close to the whole thing in a way that makes it really worthwhile to hear him think through the issues and challenges. All ideas and thoughts about other subjects, ideas or new things … Continue reading Regulate Tech #2: The Arab Spring Revisited

Three pieces – Friday reading & links

Looking for new perspectives? Here are a few articles to check out. “The New National American Elite” by Michael Lind. In this article, Lind suggests that the US has first now established a national elite – and risen from the fragmented state aristocracies that used to compete with each-other nationally: “In short, a historical narrative which describes a fall from the yeoman democracy of an … Continue reading Three pieces – Friday reading & links

President Biden and the attention-deficit

As President Joe Biden now takes on the presidency he is facing a lot of substantive challenges, but he also faces an interesting stylistic one – and that is how he communicates. We seem to be back to press-briefings and less of the tweeting that the former president excelled in until his account was banned. That has been hailed as a relief, but there is … Continue reading President Biden and the attention-deficit

Wikipedia and the future of the Internet

Wikipedia celebrates its 20th birthday and there are a lot of interesting articles out there about the wonderful and weird phenomenon that wikipedians have created and are curating. Here are a few of the perhaps less well-known “No Rest for the Wiki: The free encyclopedia is one of the last vestiges of an earlier internet” by Rebecca Panovka. In this article the author focuses not … Continue reading Wikipedia and the future of the Internet

The long arc of uncertainty bends towards…?

The IMF has published an update of its interesting uncertainty index. Noone will be surprised to find that the Covid-19 pandemic and the presidential elections drove uncertainty up, but the real scoop in the chart is the overall slant of the curve we can construct: If the upward slope of the curve suggests that independent of the actual events the world is getting more and … Continue reading The long arc of uncertainty bends towards…?

Projects – The Regulate Tech Podcast

Richard Allan is a dear friend since many years, and we have had discussions on and off for a long time — and now we have succumbed to that great pandemic weakness of starting a podcast. It is mostly Richard, and based on his very good site at Regulate.Tech, but I get to ask a few questions and opine on the margins. Do let us … Continue reading Projects – The Regulate Tech Podcast

Maybe we need a democracy habit?

In diets we all realize that what matters is what we do every day. The food we eat, the exercise we take and then the overall physical activity levels we manage to sustain. Our weight is a direct consequence of our habits. The same naturally holds for our democracy. What we do to strengthen the public dialogue, how we participate in the public sphere and … Continue reading Maybe we need a democracy habit?

The relative rate of change (Mental Models IV)

One of the things that we hear all the time is that everything is accelerating. It is the core theme of everyday commentary on politics, but also a seriously treated idea in the works of philosophers like Hartmut Rosa or Paul Virilio. This acceleration is described, at least in Rosa’s work, with dimensions of change, but not the rate of change. Just that it is … Continue reading The relative rate of change (Mental Models IV)